BIT - Behavioral Intervention Team FAQs


Q. WHAT IS BIT?

The Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) is a collaborative interdisciplinary committee of district college officials.
BIT is intended to meet two distinct objectives. First, the BIT enhances institutional awareness of potential threats to campus safety. Second, the BIT can provide students, faculty and staff with opportunities to assess and manage problematic behavior before this behavior becomes a formal violation of the Student Code of Conduct. BIT encourages faculty, staff, and students to report behavioral issues that represent disruptions that may affect the learning environment.

Q.WHAT ARE SOME SIGNS THAT A STUDENT MAY BE IN DISTRESS?

A student in distress may not be disruptive to others, but may exhibit behaviors which indicate something is wrong, show signs of emotional distress and indicate that assistance is needed. They may also be reluctant or unable to acknowledge a need for personal help. Behaviors may include:

  1. Serious grade problems or a change from consistently passing grades to unaccountably poor performance.
  2. Excessive absences, especially; if the student has previously demonstrated consistent attendance.
  3. Unusual or markedly changed patterns of interaction, i.e., avoidance of participation, excessive anxiety when called upon, domination of discussion, etc.
  4. Other characteristics that suggest stress are: a lethargic mood, rapid speech, swollen, red eyes, marked change in dress and hygiene, falling asleep during class.
  5. Repeated requests for special consideration, such as deadline extensions
  6. New or repeated behavior which pushes the limits of decorum and which interferes with effective management of the immediate environment.
  7. Unusual or exaggerated emotional responses which are inappropriate to the situation.


Q. HOW SHOULD I RESPOND WHEN A STUDENT IS DISRUPTING MY CLASS?

  1. Faculty members have established reasonable guidelines for class discussion that ensure everyone has an opportunity to participate in an orderly manner
  2. If you believe a student’s behavior is inappropriate, consider a general word of caution rather than singling a student out or embarrassing the student.
  3. If the behavior in question is irritating, but not disruptive, try speaking with the student after class. Most students are unaware of distracting habits and mannerisms, and have no intent to be offensive or disruptive. There may be rare circumstances where it is necessary to speak to a student during class. If necessary consult with the department head, the Dean of Student Services or Director of Counseling Services.
  4. If a student’s behavior reaches the point that it interferes with your ability to conduct the class or the ability of other students to benefit from the class,
    the student should be asked to leave the room for the remainder of the class period. When a student expresses a direct threat to themselves or others, or acts bizarre, highly irrational or disruptive way call Public Safety.
  5. Remember, it is NOT your responsibility to provide the professional help needed for a severely troubled/disruptive student. You need only to make the necessary call and request assistance.


Q. WHAT ARE WARNING SIGNS OF DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR?

  1. Highly disruptive behavior (e.g. hostility, aggression, violence, etc.)
  2. Inability to communicate clearly (garbled, slurred speech: unconnected, disjointed, or rambling thoughts)
  3. Loss of contact with reality (seeing or hearing things, which others cannot see or hear: beliefs or actions greatly at odds with reality or probability).
  4. Stalking behaviors.
  5. Inappropriate communications (including threatening letters, e-mail messages, harassment)
  6. Overtly suicidal thoughts (including referring to suicide as a current option or in a written assignment).
  7. Threats to harm others.


Q. HOW TO MAKE A REFFERAL

  1. To refer a student to the Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT), you can contact the Dean of Student Services, the Director of Counseling Services, the Associate Dean (s) of Enrollment Management and Student Services, any BIT member or go to . Forms will also be available on the BIT web page. Provide the name of the student (s), and a brief narrative of their behavior. If you are concerned about a student, but have not witnessed any distressing or disruptive behavior, explain your concern in detail.
  2. Although the action/outcome will depend on the situation, the BIT will intervene in support of the person of concern, as well as in support of the college policies and procedures.


Q. CAN I SUBMIT ANONYMOUSLY?

  1. You are encouraged to identify yourself because this may assist the BIT if clarification or additional information is needed.
  2. Submitting your name also gives your report more credence.
  3. Anonymous reports will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.


Q. HOW WILL I KNOW IF THE SITUATION HAS BEEN ADDRESSED?

  1. BIT will address every report that is brought to the committee.
  2. Intervention by BIT members typically involves handling of confidential information, so those filing reports will not necessarily know the resolution of the situation.
  3. If you continue to have concerns contact the Director of Counseling Services, the Dean of Student Services or the Associate Dean (s) of Enrollment Management and Student Services.