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Information Literacy

Information literacy -- the set of thinking and reasoning skills required to identify, locate, understand, evaluate, and use information -- forms the cornerstone of the teaching philosophy of Faculty Librarians at Edison State College.

The ESC Libraries’ Information Literacy Curriculum is crucial for cross-discipline student success. Information Literacy instruction equips students with the skills they need to separate authoritative information from that which is spurious within the vast extent of available information. 

Faculty Librarians at Edison State College use three methods to build and sustain students’ Information Literacy skills. They teach a one credit online course called LIS 2004: Internet for College Research; provide one-on-one instruction at the Library’s Reference Desk; and teach research instruction sessions to groups of students in either the Library’s Research Instruction Lab or in the classroom. During these sessions, Librarians teach students how to determine the nature and extent of needed information; initiate search strategies; efficiently access and retrieve information; critically evaluate and interpret information; effectively use and communicate information to accomplish a specific purpose; understand the economic, legal, and social uses of information and information technology; and observe the laws, regulations, and institutional policies related to the access and use of information. The Library’s Information Literacy Curriculum includes instruction in the Library’s Collection of print, electronic, and audiovisual resources, in addition to free Internet sites.

Information Literacy is an integral component of all disciplines, learning environments, and levels of education. According to the Association of College and Research Libraries, an effective Information Literacy curriculum enables “learners to master content and extend their investigations, become self-directed, and to assume greater control over their own learning.” Information literate people essentially have learned how to learn.

Learn more about Information Literacy on the Association of College and Research Libraries' Information Literacy Website.

To arrange for a research instruction session, go to the Request Instruction Session page.